What NOT to Do in an Interview

Congratulations! You’ve got through to interview stage. Now you have reached this point, do you have an idea of how to impress the interviewer?


One of the major problems is that you may aim to try so hard to make sure everything goes right, that it’s easy to forget the minor things which could make the difference between being let go and securing the job. While no-one sets out to annoy the interviewer, it’s easily done if you don’t know what to avoid. There are certain traits you should avoid during an interview if you wish to make a good impression and prevent being eliminated from the process. With this in mind, here are some useful tips to take on board on ‘what not to do’ during an interview:


1. Show up late

One of the worst things you can possibly do is to show up late to an interview – even if it wasn’t your fault. Even one minute passed the set time will give off the impression that you simply can’t be bothered and have no respect for the interviewer’s time. It is also extremely unprofessional and shows that you lack organizational skills, which are so important in any role and any workplace.


To prevent being late, plan the route ahead of time and add an extra 30 minutes onto your journey time so you have time to spare and cut out additional stress. You also want to ensure you're not too early but usually showing up 10-15 minutes before your interview time is perfect! 2. Talk badly about a previous employer

Regardless of why you may have left your former job, you should never bad-mouth your previous employer. Regardless of how true your comments may be, your interviewer will get the impression that you will do the same to them if things happened to go wrong. Try and keep your thoughts to yourself – remember that it’s an interview, not a social gossip!


If for some reason you DID leave your last job on bad terms, you're best stating that the job role or progression sadly wasn't as previously discussed with the employer and you feel you're not using your skills to their full potential. This shows you're passionate about growing with a company and that you have a lot to give to a new company that someone else is missing out on. 3. Be arrogant and overconfident

While the interviewer is keen to see that you have confidence in your abilities, it’s easy to step over the fine line into cockiness. You don’t want to give the impression that you’re entitled to the role just because you have the relevant skills and experience. Show the interviewer that you’re an easy person to work with and can be moulded to suit their company standards and morals.


Instead you can pick two examples of how you have used the skills required for the role in a previous role, adding some key achievement points in too to support it. Unless asked otherwise, leave it at those but keep it short and to the point. 4. Dress inappropriately

Before you attend an interview, you may like to ask the hiring manager what the dress code is if you haven’t been informed, however, it’s better to be overdressed than underdressed and certainly don't show up in your casual wear if they usually go casual... remember you're not part of the team yet!


What you wear says a lot about your attitudes towards the role, so if in any doubt, always dress in a smart suit to cover all bases. 5. Ask about the salary and benefits too early

There is plenty of time to ask the interviewer about the salary and benefits on offer once you have been offered the job role - so don’t ask questions about money during the interview.


While this may be one of the reasons for applying for the job, never make this point clear to the interviewer. If a candidate seems overly keen on how much they’ll be earning rather than why the job is suited for them, they’re highly unlikely to be hired.


If you have an interview coming up in the next few weeks, we hope this guide has come in useful to make a few notes on ‘what not to do’ to give you a better chance of securing your dream role. Ensure you're always well prepared.


Good luck!